megxnmxrie:

Ginger hair catching the light ^.^ 

megxnmxrie:

Ginger hair catching the light ^.^ 

(via lalunesorcier)

I love her so much!

I love her so much!

(via viciouslyvivacious)

isthequestiontheanswer:

Don’t worry, there’s more where that came from, my dear.

isthequestiontheanswer:

Don’t worry, there’s more where that came from, my dear.

There’s a lot of sex shown in “Nymphomaniac,” but von Trier’s depiction of sex acts is blandly pneumatic, mechanical, virtually effortless, and filmed as casually and as indifferently as is the rest of the action. There’s no metaphysic, no mystery, no intricacy, no thrill to his sense of sex. The very notion of pleasure itself is one that escapes him.

The core fantasy is of a woman who is man’s random source of pleasure and who, when she withholds herself from manhood at large because of her emotional bonds (or would take other action resulting from those bonds), von Trier sees fit to punish her for it, brutally. And the woman finds that punishment just and apt, not requiring redress of any sort. What’s more, von Trier covers his tracks with a flourish of feminist rhetoric to defend Joe’s and all women’s freedom—even as he defines that freedom strictly in his own terms of constant libertine availability and doesn’t grant women the freedom to pursue anything else, not as long as there are men in need.

He nailed it. This movie is even more disappointing than “A Dangerous Method.”

The New Yorker | ‘Nymphomaniac’: Lars Von Trier’s Joyless Sexual Tantrum by Richard Brody (via filmantidote)

(via filmantidote)